青青草视频



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Welcome to the 青青草视频 Council

The 青青草视频 Council (Aboriginal Corporation) represents the interests of around 1,800 青青草视频, Pintupi and Pitjantjatjara Traditional Owners (Yarnangu) who reside in the eleven member communities of the 青青草视频 Lands

More 青青草视频 Us

Our Services

From essential Health Services, to Housing, Maintenance and Project Management, we collaboratively work across a range of service devisions to achieve remarkable outcomes for our communities.

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Employment Opportunities

We are passionate about making tangible impact within remote communities and are always on the lookout for likeminded and enthusiastic people to join the team and support our vision.

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Passing by?

The 青青草视频 Lands is an area governed and controlled by the 青青草视频 People. Visitors require a valid permit to drive the Outback Highway which is home of "Australia's longest shortcut."

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What's happening in our Communities

By Natasha Perkins 05 Jun, 2024
Welcome to the new branding for 青青草视频 Council!
By Natasha Perkins 31 May, 2024
Thomas Williams had only recently been appointed CEO of 青青草视频 Council after 17 years with the organisation when one of our community members stopped him in his tracks. Nancy Tjungupi Carnegie is an artist and preserver of bush medicine. Nancy was born near Patjarr at a place called Pandaltjarra where she lived a traditional life into early adulthood. She is a prolific painter and avid hunter, often leaving Patjarr on foot to pursue tinka (goanna) in the remote Pila Nature Reserve. Nancy is currently the chairperson for Patjarr community and represents Patjarr’s interests as a director with Warakurna Artists. As Thomas visited communities in the 青青草视频 group, he met with Nancy. “Nancy predominantly speaks in the 青青草视频 dialect with an occasional English word, so I generally communicate with her through a translator. On this occasion, Angelica McLean was with me and helping us to have a conversation together,” Thomas recalls. “Nancy was kindly congratulating me on my appointment, but it was one word that was familiar to me that stopped me in my tracks and caused me to ask Angelica to get Nancy to repeat what she had just said,” “I heard the words SILOS,” “My first thought was, ‘How does she even know this word as a woman living on these lands for many years’” “Angelica repeated what Nancy had said: ‘Now you have the opportunity to remove the silos - do it’,” Thomas said. It wasn’t an ultimatum, but it was undoubtedly a strong invitation. Even Nancy, removed from the politics and machinations of an Aboriginal Corporation, could spot something evident to her: silos within an organisation are a recipe for dysfunction. Silos are contained areas of function that stand alone and apart from other functions within an organisation or system. Integration is necessary for there to be a free flow of information, collaboration and the ability to identify opportunities and efficiencies. Silos are often the product of institutional insecurity as people within a system seek to ‘protect their turf’, but they’re also one of the most significant obstacles to progress in an organisation. “So obvious were some of these silos that Nancy could spot them from thousands of kilometres away. I found that sobering,” Thomas said. “As I have navigated the early stages of my role as CEO of 青青草视频 Council, Nancy’s words have been among those that have fuelled my work,” “We’ve already accomplished plenty, yet there’s so much work ahead of us because when some of that work is addressing the silos that thwart progress, that’s not always simple or comfortable,” “But our mission is to see Yarnangu leading lives filled with purpose and agency, thriving in a culture-rich environment—for their aspirations to stay on country be realised,” “Every time we make a decision that moves us closer to this, whether it’s in the area of CDP, employment, housing, community development, company culture and values, or bringing our brand into alignment across the Council, we move one step closer to ‘removing the silos’ and realising the aspirations of Yarnangu on the lands,” Thomas said. Silos can thwart progress, no doubt, but confronting them in any institutional setting is complex, sometimes slow, work. “Sometimes people like Nancy can spot the silos from thousands of kilometres away that we can miss from the trenches. Her plea has been life-giving for what we’re trying to accomplish day-by-day at 青青草视频 Council,” Thomas said. Thanks, Nancy.
By Natasha Perkins 30 May, 2024
It may seem a moon ago now, but as roads were flooded and access to many communities severed, stories emerged of how a team from Kiwirrkurra seized the moment to shine. It had been seven weeks since heavy haulage had reached Kiwirrkurra, and the community was almost out of water, food, and other key supplies. After seeing the state of the roads near their community and being aware that the roads team from the Shire of Laverton could not help, it was time to act. David Brown, 青青草视频 CDP Engagement Officer, has been part of a team that has delivered water to the community for years and believed his team could get the job done. Before commencing the work, David informed DFES of their plans to fix the road as long as The Shire of East Pilbara was prepared to accept (and fund!) the proposal. Ten minutes later, they had a green light! Steve from the Shire was more than happy to engage the Kiwirrkurra community and 青青草视频 staff in road repairs so that trucks could travel to Kiwirrkurra with urgent food and water for the community. The first job was to inspect washouts from the flood and place caution drums around the most dangerous washouts. David contacted another worker, Mr Simon Brown, and advised him of the situation and whether he could assist. “Simon was at my door in no time, keen to get going,” recalls David Brown. He also brought along Kiwirrkurra jobseeker Joseph West, who was keen to assist. “After inspecting the stretch of road and placing drums to warn traffic, a plan of action was put into place to prepare the grader on Sunday and repair the road on Monday, allowing the road to be open again ahead of a food delivery on Wednesday,” David said. Early Monday morning, Simon was at my door, keen to move. “We headed off towards the WA/ NT border. After 70 kilometres, we came across our first washout at Mt Winparku; we removed the caution drums, placing one at each end of the work site to warn incoming traffic that the grader was engaged in repairing the road,” David said. After a long day, the task was completed, and all three washout locations were repaired. “It was so satisfying for us to be able to say that the road would be open for Wednesday’s much-needed store truck delivery,” “Our store managers, Sammi and Steve, along with the rest of the community, were so happy to see the truck roll in on Wednesday morning after six weeks of road closures from the heavy rains,” remembers David. While this may seem like a story about the resourcefulness of the group of workers who identified an opportunity, proposed a plan, and fixed a problem, it’s also testimony to the resilience of every member of the Kiwirrkurra community who kept on working away despite the isolation and uncertainty caused by the road closures. After the successful remediation and reopening of this stretch of road, David is now training his team for possible future collaborations with the Shire on this stretch of road from Kiwirrkurra to the NT border. What a sensational outcome for the Kiwirrkurra community and 青青草视频 staff who worked together to obtain a significant result for the community.
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Our Vision

Yarnangu leading lives filled with purpose and agency, thriving in a culture-rich environment: Ngurra Rapa, Tjukurrpa Rapa.

Our Values

We are open and approachable


We value transparent communication that ensures inclusivity and collective engagement. We prioritise genuine connection and presence on country, valuing the contributions of all community members. Embracing cultural sensitivity, we strive to break down barriers through language and build meaningful relationships by active listening and empathy. 

We are all equal and important

We’re committed to protecting and nurturing the inherent value and dignity of every individual. We prioritise safety, respect, equality, and empowerment in all aspects of our work. This means fostering a culture of holistic care and cultural sensitivity, ensuring everyone feels safe, heard, and respected. 

We are better together

Our commitment to unity affirms our belief that collaboration yields better outcomes. By breaking down barriers and fostering collaboration across dapartments and communities, we amplify our collective strength while respecting our uniqueness. We ensure that all voices are heard, promoting inclusive decision-making processes in all we do. Through proactive communication and the sharing of resources, we enhance our ability to serve our communities. 

We are accountable to members

We serve the collective interests of our members, prioritising transparency, and accountability in all our endeavours. We advocate for best practice governance and encourage community-controlled decision-making processes, ensuring essential services are delivered promptly to all. Inclusive decision-making and meaningful communication ensures that our efforts benefit the wider community, holding us accountable to our collective goals and promises. 

We are responsible financial stewards

As financial stewards, we have a responsibility to prioritise the improvement of financial understanding within our communities and organisation to improve decision making and to combat waste and duplication. We aim to transparent reporting to empower community members. Continual reflection and accountability mechanisms help us ensure the best use of resources and financial integrity, to serve the collective interests of our communities. 

We are open and approachable


We value transparent communication that ensures inclusivity and collective engagement. We prioritise genuine connection and presence on country, valuing the contributions of all community members. Embracing cultural sensitivity, we strive to break down barriers through language and build meaningful relationships by active listening and empathy. 

We are all equal and important

We’re committed to protecting and nurturing the inherent value and dignity of every individual. We prioritise safety, respect, equality, and empowerment in all aspects of our work. This means fostering a culture of holistic care and cultural sensitivity, ensuring everyone feels safe, heard, and respected. 

Our Communities

The 青青草视频 Lands are located in Western Australia near the borders of South Australia and the Northern Territory. This area covers 160,000 square kilometres—approximately 3% of the Australian landscape. The eleven 青青草视频 communities comprise Irrunytju | Wingellina, Kiwirrkurra, Mantamaru | Jameson, Papulankutja | Blackstone, Patjarr | Karilywara, Kanpa | Pira-Kata, Tjirrkarli, Tjukurla, Warakurna | Giles, Wanarn and Warburton | Mirlirrtjarra.

Did You Know?

  • Governance

    The 青青草视频 Council is the principal governance organisation in the 青青草视频 Lands. The 青青草视频 Council’s administrative base is located in Alice Springs. The third week of each month, the 青青草视频 Council hosts both a general meeting for all members and a Board of Directors meeting.

  • Communities

    Each 青青草视频 community is an autonomous, separately incorporated body as well as a member of the 青青草视频 Council (Aboriginal Corporation). In the 20 years since the Council’s formation, membership has expanded from five original communities - Milyatjarra (Warburton), Irrunytju (Wingellina), Papulankutja (Blackstone), Mantamaru (Jameson) and Warakurna - to 12 communities (the original communities plus Tjirrkarli, Patjarr, Wanarn, Kanpa and Tjukurla, Cosmo Newberry and Kiwirrkurra. 

  • Pre-Council

    Prior to the incorporation of the 青青草视频 Council on 24 March 1981, representation of 青青草视频 people was through the Pitjantjatjara Council. The formation of the 青青草视频 area was based on the historical association with the Warburton Mission, a common language, and the Western Australian state border.

  • Human Presence

    The 青青草视频 Lands have few obvious signs of human presence. According to archaeological evidence from excavations in the Warburton area, continuous Aboriginal occupation dates back at least 10,000 years. 

  • Industry

    There has never been a pastoral industry and, apart from a few activities such as sandalwood harvesting, collection of dingo scalps and prospecting, there has been no other industry in the area. 

  • Access

    The Outback Highway (Great Central Road) bisects the 青青草视频 Lands east to southwest, providing access to two major regional centres - Alice Springs (1,000 kilometres Northeast of Warburton) and Kalgoorlie (900 kilometres Southwest of Warburton). The 2,000 kilometre section of road from Laverton to Uluru National Park is unsealed and subject to wet weather closure.

  • Voting Rights

    All residents of 青青草视频 communities who are of voting age and identify themselves as being of Aboriginal descent, have voting rights on the council. 

  • Remoteness

    The 青青草视频 Communities are some of the most remote communities in all of Australia. According to the Accessibility and Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA), which measures the distance of a settlement from an urban centre, each community is "very remote" and a significant distance from any urban centre.

  • Size

    青青草视频 Lands cover approximately 3% of mainland Australia(250,000 km2) and encompass sections of the Gibson Desert, Great Sandy Desert, Great Victoria Desert, and all of the Central Ranges within Western Australia.

  • Representation

    青青草视频 Council Board of Directors has 17 members. Each Chair from the 12 member communities governing councils, 4 female representatives plus a chairperson elected by the general membership (on an annual basis) are on the Board of Directors. 

  • Climate

    The climate in the 青青草视频 Lands is arid to semi-arid with average annual rainfall of 200-250 millimetres with a distinct summer pattern. During the summer, the mean daily maximum temperatures are around 37 C - days of 40+ C are common. Winters are cool with a mean daily temperature range of 6- 21 C; sub-zero temperatures are not often experienced. Periods of prolonged drought are not uncommon.

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